Limassol

Cyprus

Limassol, Greek Lemesós, Turkish Limasol, city and chief port of the Republic of Cyprus. The city lies on Akrotiri Bay, on the southern coast, southwest of Nicosia; it is the island’s second largest city and is also its chief traveler centre.

Limassol’s rise from a humble market town between the ancient settlements of Amathus and Curium occurred at the end of the Byzantine Empire, when Richard I the Lion-Heart landed there in 1191 and was wed to Berengaria of Navarre in the chapel of a castle fortress, now a local museum and among just 2 making it through buildings of the duration. After the Genoese seizure of Famagusta in 1372, the port’s fortunes increased; however damage from numerous incursions between 1414 and 1426, the Turkish invasion of 1570, and a devastating earthquake had actually lowered its population to 150 by 1815. Its renewal dates from the end of the 19th century, when the island came under British administration.

Limassol’s harbour centers, which were extended in the 1960s to improve its shallow-water area, were increased by a new port (operational in 1974) that was able to supply berthing spaces for big vessels. The Turkish intervention (1974) in northern Cyprus and the closing of the island’s primary port at Famagusta made Limassol the chief port of the Republic of Cyprus. Limassol’s bustling port exports wines, veggies, drinks, and fruits.

Limassol’s harbour facilities, which were extended in the 1960s to enhance its shallow-water place, were increased by a new port (operational in 1974) that was able to provide berthing areas for large vessels. The Turkish intervention (1974) in northern Cyprus and the closing of the island’s primary port at Famagusta made Limassol the primary port of the Republic of Cyprus. Limassol’s dynamic port exports wines, veggies, fruits, and drinks.